CHRISTMAS OFFER Subscribe to Derbyshire Life today CLICK HERE

A Better Life, Granted

PUBLISHED: 19:05 13 June 2012 | UPDATED: 22:03 21 February 2013

A Better Life, Granted

A Better Life, Granted

The Prince's Countryside Fund has given out 35 grants to rural projects, but how has the money been used so far? Abigail Price finds out.

We all want our little

corner of the

countryside to be

breathtakingly

beautiful and wellcared

for. But the real cost of the upkeep

for natures garden is expensive. And

thats where Prince Charles stepped in to

give it attention, famous for his love of

the great outdoors and supporting

Britains rural communities.

In July 2010, he launched the Princes

Countryside Fund, which raises money

from businesses that want to improve the

long-term viability of the British

countryside and its rural communities.

Since then, 35 grants have been given

out, pouring money in to projects which

deliver the three objectives of the fund: to

improve the sustainability of British

farming and rural communities; to

reconnect consumers with countryside

issues; and to support farming crisis

charities through a dedicated emergency

funding stream.

In its first year, the fund raised well

over 1 million and much of this has been

dished out to projects throughout the UK,

including Bell View, a day care centre for

older people in Belford, Northumberland.

They were awarded 18,000 which will be

used to buy a specialist wheelchair

accessible vehicle.

An estimated 1,000 beneficiaries

included an apprentice scheme to train

the next generation of hill farmers, a

project to help young farmers find rural

employment, and computer training for

isolated communities.

Victoria Elms, programme manager for

the Princes Countryside Fund, said: The

fund supports large and small projects in

rural communities and tries to reconnect

people to the countryside.

So, how have the organisers of the

projects spent the grants and who has

benefited?

The Clervaux Trust in Yorkshire was

given given a grant of 45,500. The

educational charity works with young

people to develop their skills and

experience in growing and harvesting,

animal husbandry and land based craft

skills.

The money has been spent on hiring

an apprentice and purchasing a farm

truck and trailer which has meant the

development of a local vegetable box

scheme, run by volunteers. By the end of

the project, accredited training in land

skills, horticulture and agriculture will

have been delivered to 60

students.

Rick McCordall, the commercial

manager, said: How we have spent the

money can be roughly divided like this:

4,000 on animal husbandry, 3,900 on

land and development, including staff,

2,500 on a new apprentice, 4,000 on

29 sheep, 5,000 on a pick-up truck and

trailer and 3,000 on overheads.

The pick-up truck in particular has

been a huge help to us and there is so

much more that we want to do with the

remaining money. We also intend to get

out into the community and attend more

local events and extend the numbers of

people who access the project, including

students.

Miss Elms added: We are delighted

with how The Clervaux Trust is

progressing and furthering the aims of

the Princes Countryside Fund.

For more information on the Princes Countryside

Fund, visit www.princes countrysidefund.org.uk.

We all want our little corner of the countryside to bebreathtakingly beautiful and well-cared for. But the real cost of the upkeep for natures garden is expensive. And thats where Prince Charles stepped in to give it attention, famous for his love of the great outdoors and supporting Britains rural communities.

In July 2010, he launched the Princes Countryside Fund, which raises money from businesses that want to improve the long-term viability of the British countryside and its rural communities.

Since then, 35 grants have been given out, pouring money in to projects which deliver the three objectives of the fund: to improve the sustainability of British farming and rural communities; to reconnect consumers with countryside issues; and to support farming crisis charities through a dedicated emergency funding stream.

In its first year, the fund raised well over 1 million and much of this has been dished out to projects throughout the UK, including Bell View, a day care centre for older people in Belford, Northumberland. They were awarded 18,000 which will be used to buy a specialist wheelchair accessible vehicle.

An estimated 1,000 beneficiaries included an apprentice scheme to train the next generation of hill farmers, a project to help young farmers find rural employment, and computer training for isolated communities.

Victoria Elms, programme manager for the Princes Countryside Fund, said: The fund supports large and small projects in rural communities and tries to reconnect people to the countryside.

So, how have the organisers of the projects spent the grants and who has benefited?

The Clervaux Trust in Yorkshire was given given a grant of 45,500. The educational charity works with young people to develop their skills and experience in growing and harvesting, animal husbandry and land based craft skills.

The money has been spent on hiring an apprentice and purchasing a farm truck and trailer which has meant the development of a local vegetable box scheme, run by volunteers. By the end of the project, accredited training in land skills, horticulture and agriculture will have been delivered to 60 students.

Rick McCordall, the commercial manager, said: How we have spent the money can be roughly divided like this: 4,000 on animal husbandry, 3,900 on land and development, including staff, 2,500 on a new apprentice, 4,000 on 29 sheep, 5,000 on a pick-up truck and trailer and 3,000 on overheads.

The pick-up truck in particular has been a huge help to us and there is so much more that we want to do with the remaining money. We also intend to get out into the community and attend more local events and extend the numbers of people who access the project, including students.

Miss Elms added: We are delighted with how The Clervaux Trust is progressing and furthering the aims of the Princes Countryside Fund.

For more information on the Princes CountrysideFund, visitwww.princes countrysidefund.org.uk.

0 comments

More from Out & About

Andrew Griffiths meets Jim Dixon, the former Chief Executive Officer of the Peak District National Park.

Read more

This walk offers a dance with the Dove and a meander by the Manifold, whilst along the way passing a church, castle remains, country houses and a hollow way

Read more

With winter on the horizon, trees glow with colour, migratory birds arrive and house spiders set off in search of a mate

Read more

Ann Hodgkin investigates a case of the sincerest form of flattery… or industrial espionage!

Read more

Derbyshire Wildlife Trust’s vision is of landscapes rich in wildlife, valued by everyone. They will achieve this 
by pursuing their mission of creating Living Landscapes. Here Julia Gow, the White Peak Reserve Officer at Derbyshire Wildlife Trust tells us about the reserve above the River Wye

Read more

Nigel Powlson visits Sudbury where a shopping courtyard is attracting even more visitors to this quintessential English village

Read more

If you’re walking in the Peak District, the chances are that you could encounter a reservoir at some point during your ramble. There are dozens of resevoirs dotted around all corners of the national park, we pick some of our favourite walks from our archive.

Read more
Peak District

A five-year Heritage Lottery-funded scheme, launched in 2010, was designed to encourage the restoration and conservation of the distinctive landscape character of a large area of north-east Derbyshire.

Read more

Enjoy the wonder of woodland in our glorious Derwent Valley on this park and ride special.

Read more

Paul Hobson reveals some of the fascinating wildlife there is to be found in this month of transition

Read more

From far away constellations to gas clouds, our night skies are bursting with natural wonders – if you know where to look... Viv Micklefield goes stargazing in Derbyshire

Read more

Derbyshire Wildlife Trust works across six Living Landscapes with 46 nature reserves to ensure there is wildlife and wild places for everyone. Reserve officer Sam Willis tells us about one of his favourite places – Ladybower Wood Nature Reserve

Read more

A multi-million pound makeover attracts more leading brands to one of the UK’s biggest shopping destinations

Read more

The first ever National GetOutside Day takes place on Sunday 30 September with the aim of getting 1 million people active outdoors across the UK.

Read more

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to the following newsletters:

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy


Subscribe or buy a mag today

Topics of Interest


Local Business Directory


Property Search