Peak District Walk - Hathersage and Bamford

PUBLISHED: 11:39 26 April 2010 | UPDATED: 15:30 03 May 2020

Looking towards Bamford edge from Main Road

Looking towards Bamford edge from Main Road

as submitted

A walk from Hathersage to and back again that takes in the Derwent river, Shatton, Bamford and Hurst Clough

Linear Distance: 7 miles

Approximate time: 3½ hours continuous walking

Total height climbed: Approx 300ft

Car park: In Hathersage SK231815

Stiles: 8

Refreshments: Cintra’s is an authentic tearoom and tea garden, Main Road, Hathersage; the Bay Tree Coffee Shop in the High Peak Garden Centre, Bamford

Toilets: In Hathersage



Directions: From Chesterfield take the A619 to Baslow. In Baslow take the A623 to Calver where you turn right onto the A625 for about 400 metres. Then you take a left turn to follow the B6001 to Grindleford. Turn sharp left in Grindleford still on the B6001 to drive up past The William Hotel. Follow this road to Hathersage where you turn right to the car park.



Description: The first 3½ miles is mainly flat walking along the Heritage Way where you have the river on the right and over to the left the rise up to Shatton Moor. After the garden centre the route is slightly more undulating. To reach Bamford you pass the mill area via a footbridge and very big stepping stones (after heavy rain it may be advisable to ring the county council offices in Matlock – 01629 580000 – to ask for information on floods in the area). After Bamford the route becomes much more undulating with two steep climbs.

 The presence of the river led to the growth of the village at the time of the Industrial Revolution. In 1780 the corn mill became a cotton mill. In 1820 it was rebuilt as we see it today. In 1965 the mill was sold again to be used for the manufacture of electrical furnaces.



ROUTE INSTRUCTIONS



1. From the car park entrance turn right down the road to the junction with the B6001. Turn left and in about 100metres turn right down Dore Lane.



2. Walk under the bridge. Where the road bends right cross a stile on the left by a farm gate.(A) Follow the track and where it turns right keep straight on to go over a stile. Follow the well used path with a fence on the right. Pass through a small gate and stile to reach the B6001.



3. Turn right over the bridge then immediately turn right through a stile and a gate. (B)



4. Follow the undulating and meandering riverside path for about 2½ miles (1 hour), passing through small gates crossing footbridges and climbing a flight of steps.



5.(C) On reaching the road in Shatton village via a stile turn right down to and across the main road. Go through a small way-marked gate by the footpath post signed to Thornhill and Yorkshire Bridge. Walk across the bottom end of the garden centre car park. Go through a gap and under the bridge.



6. (D) Almost immediately turn left up the bank to go through a small gate. Keep straight on parallel with the railway for about 125 metres then bear off right to follow a hedge close on the left – which shortly bends round to the left – aiming for the Quaker House. Cross the stile by the gate onto the minor road by the Quaker house.



7. Turn left and in a few metres turn right up a path by the house. At the junction with a track turn right to follow the Yorkshire Bridge route on the Thornhill Trail.



8. After nearly half a mile (10 minutes) turn right by the footpath sign to go through a small gate. (E)



9. Walk down the field to a track and turn right to pass a barn then cross a stile by a gate/gateway on the left. Bear right diagonally across the field.



10. Go through a gate. Keep straight on across the middle of the field aiming for the mill buildings ahead. Go through the gate, across the footbridge and the stepping stones. Walk up past the imposing mill buildings and on up to the road. Turn right.



11. At the next road junction turn left. Follow this partly surfaced road uphill to join the main road through Bamford.



12. Cross the road to the footpath sign. Walk up the path between the houses, cross a drive and on up the path. At the next group of houses look out for a new footpath sign on the left which directs you across a drive to another path between the houses. Go through a gap and keep straight on across the small field. Cross a minor road via a stile and a gate.



13. Turn right then bear slightly down to the fence round the wood. Follow this fence to and through a small gate. (F) Keep straight on up through the wood to go through a metal kissing gate. Turn right along a track below the Bamford Filters. After going round a left-hand bend you join a surfaced drive. In a few metres leave the drive to turn sharp left by the footpath posts (G). Follow the railings close on the left. At the next junction with the drive bear left to continue following the railings round the perimeter of the Bamford Filters. At the end of the surfaced drive keep straight on along a path.



14. The route now descends steep steps to cross Upper Hurst Brook. On reaching a track turn left



15. Follow the partly surfaced and rutted track as it winds very steeply up hill. In about a quarter of a mile, where the track bends left, keep straight on through the right-hand gate by the bridleway post. (H)



16. Walk down the slightly sunken path to a track and turn left to Nether Hurst. Pass the bunk house on the right and continue down the lane. Cross the drive-way to the farm to go over the way-marked stile ahead. (I)



17. Turn right to follow the hedge close on the right. Cross the footbridge and walk up the partly slabbed steep field path keeping the boundary close on the right. Go through the gate and head up the next field following the line of bushes and trees on the left. Go through a small gate ahead (not the stile). (J)



18. Turn right down the road. At the road junction continue downhill on Coggers Lane following the Hathersage sign. In about half a mile at the T-junction with Jaggers Lane turn left. Walk down into Hathersage. Walk along the main road to the pedestrian cross then turn right up past the chapel back to the car park.

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