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Details

  • Start: Above Birchover SK242628
  • End: Above Birchover SK242628
  • Country: England
  • County: Derbyshire
  • Type: Country
  • Nearest pub: The Red Lion Inn and The Druid Inn
  • Ordnance Survey:
  • Difficulty: Medium
Google Map

Description

A short easy walk where Bronze Age and 21st century meet. The Nine Ladies Stone Circle is thought to have been a ceremonial site. The King Stone seems to suggest that it was also used for astronomical purposes.

Linear distance - 21/2 or 31/4 miles
Total height climbed - Less than 300 ft
Approximate time - for 31/4 mile walk - 11/2 hours
Stiles - 4
Parking - Above Birchover SK242628
Refreshments - The Red Lion Inn and The Druid Inn
Picnic - Instruction 6 on Stanton Moor
Toilets - In Birchover


Directions: From Bakewell take the A6 south to Rowsley and Matlock. In nearly 21/2 miles turn right onto the B5056 Ashbourne road. In about 3/4 mile follow this B road round to the left. In just over one mile turn left to drive uphill to Birchover. Drive through the village and at the top of the hill, just out of the village, follow the road round to the left then round a right hand bend to turn left into the car park opposite the quarry buildings. Park up to the right.


Description: A short easy walk where Bronze Age and 21st century meet. The Nine Ladies Stone Circle is thought to have been a ceremonial site. The King Stone seems to suggest that it was also used for astronomical purposes. The large gritstones on the moor, such as the Cork Stone, are natural features where harder stone outcrops were left as the plateau wore down. The tower on the edge of the moor was erected as a tribute to Earl Grey. He was responsible for carrying the Reform Bill through Parliament in 1832. There are many easy-to-follow paths across this small open moorland. The gritstone and sandy paths are not muddy even when wet, which helps to make this a good winter walk.

THE ROUTE


1. Leave the car park via a wall gap in the top parking area, to join the road. Walk left up the road for about 400 metres.


2. Turn right by the Open Access and footpath signs. Walk up the path to cross a stile onto the Stanton Moor.


3. Follow the moorland path for about 200 metres and at the Cork Stone turn left. In a few metres at a fork of paths take the left-hand fork. Walk through the heather passing old overgrown quarries. Aim for the birch wood ahead.


4. Follow the path through the open birch wood. As you leave the wood you see a fence ahead and before this fence turn right along the main path, which soon narrows through the heather. As you come out into a clearing you will pass the King Stone then The Nine Ladies Stone Circle.

5. At the information board ahead cross the track to keep straight on. A little further on ignore a track off right to keep straight on along a narrower path aiming for the tower. On reaching the tower cross the stile to the right of it and pass it on your left to go down steps.


6. At 'The Stanton Moor National Trust' sign turn right. Follow the path along the top of the escarpment for about 3/4 mile keeping an old fence close on the right all the way. (There are side paths up to high stone outcrops where the views are far reaching and where you will find picnic spots.)


7. Cross a fence stile on the right at the next National Trust sign. Turn left, ignoring a right-hand path, and walk through the heather. At the next crossing of paths turn left down a stony path to cross a stile onto the road.


8. Turn right up the minor road for just over 1/4 mile to the road junction. At this point you can either turn right back to the car park or keep straight on down into Birchover.


9. Walk through the village passing the village store, the toilets and The Red Lion Inn. Opposite The Druid Inn turn right.


10. Walk up a fairly steep woodland path. Along this route you will see the interesting remains of old quarries and buildings. In just over 1/4 mile you will reach the car park.

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